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Iowa dog breeder kept over 500 animals in poor conditions

An puppy mill agreed to surrender over 500 dogs on Tuesday after he had hoarded them in unsanitary conditions. 

Daniel Gingerich, of Seymour, Iowa, faces criminal charges after failing to provide proper nutrition, water and veterinary assistance for the dogs while in his care.

Multiple dogs were discovered dead, malnourished, or injured at six of his mills across the state.

The ASPCA and ARL have been working together to remove the 514 suffering animals from the properties with over 200 being rescued so far. 

Gingerich has reportedly racked up more than 100 violations of the Animal Welfare Act following 18 investigations from the USDA.

His license was suspended for 21 days and a federal indictment was filed for him in September. 

Iowa dog breeder Daniel Gingerich is said to face criminal charges after 514 dogs were discovered in unsanitary conditions in at least six of his mills

Iowa dog breeder Daniel Gingerich is said to face criminal charges after 514 dogs were discovered in unsanitary conditions in at least six of his mills

Gingerich was slapped with 120 violations of the Animal Welfare Act following 18 investigations by the USDA that show he failed to provide the dogs with adequate nutrition, clean water and veterinary care

Gingerich was slapped with 120 violations of the Animal Welfare Act following 18 investigations by the USDA that show he failed to provide the dogs with adequate nutrition, clean water and veterinary care

Animals were found dead, sick, or injured during the course of the six-month investigation

Animals were found dead, sick, or injured during the course of the six-month investigation

In a complaint filed on Friday, the Department of Justice described the harrowing conditions that the dog breeder had kept animals in.  

Bug-infested beds, leaking ceilings, and gaping floors were spotted in the mills, according to the the federal indictment.

A caged poodle seen whining and barking in the 119 degree summer heat on the driveway.

A Golden retriever puppy with body extremities, including her ears, cold to the touch and her body hot was seen with barely any fat and sunken muscles .

The investigators had inspected an Australian Shepard with dark brown tartar-colored teeth and two dogs with overgrown toenails walking around gaping floors covered in urine and feces.

A female Bernese Mountain dog was also found with an abnormal condition that was spotted on her nose. 

They also noticed malnourish puppies gasping for air and even witnessed a poodle die right in front of them during an August investigation.  

The starving animals covered in matted fur and skin lesions, some with fresh blood, were also seen covered in fleas and eating mold-infested food.

Their beds distorted in dark color were also found covered in mold removal spray near me and dirt.   

Gingerich had also allegedly hid animals that needed to be taken to the veterinarian for treatment in dirty horse stalls.  

He had also failed to record medical records for the animals as well as neglecting to document dog sales.   

The starving animals were also seen covered in matted fur and skin lesions

The starving animals were also seen covered in matted fur and skin lesions

Gingerich kept sick animals in dirty feces infested horse stalls

Gingerich kept sick animals in dirty feces infested horse stalls 

A rescue organization also claimed they found 13 of Gingerich’s dogs in poor condition after purchasing the animals from him.

The USDA, who are meant to oversee breeders and animal conditions, were criticized by the ASPCA for failing to address Gingerich’s cruelty after giving him a license in October 2019.

The organization had also sued the department for not enforcing the AWA.

‘(Gingerich’s) shocking cruelty is a predictable result of the USDA,’ ASPCA legal advocacy senior counsel Robert Hensley said.

‘Allowing the very animals they have a legal and moral obligation to protect to endure prolonged and extreme suffering.’

The USDA had began investigating Gingerich’s property in March after they were formerly denied opportunities to do so.

During a six-month investigation, the department discovered he had racked up 120 violations of the AWA. 

The animal removal process began on October 14 with over 200 of them rescued in the course of a couple days. 

‘The light is shining on bad actors in the dog breeding industry as a result of this action by the Department of Justice,’ Tom Colvin, CEO at the Animal Rescue League of Iowa said.

‘A new approach of stopping them before animals suffer is long overdue. 

‘We are thankful to all our partners in putting an end to this operation specifically, and we look forward to making this a step toward large-scale change.’

Gingerich had operated six puppy mills across the state in Iowa

Gingerich had operated six puppy mills across the state in Iowa

The ASPCA and ARL are working together to rescue the animals and bring them to proper shelters

The ASPCA and ARL are working together to rescue the animals and bring them to proper shelters

A total of 275 dogs were uncovered at the main Seymour mill on 3125 Davis Road with breeds such as Toy Aussies, Cocker Spaniels, Labradoodles and Goldendoodles as well as others. 

Another 161 dogs at 25316 Elk Chapel Road in Lamont, which had a Pomsky breed, were found as well.  

Both the ASPCA and ARL are said to confiscate 33 animals from 28920 189th Avenue in Davis City, 23 at 12340 240th Street at another Lamoni site, 13 in from 1405 126th Street in Hazleton and 9 at 3002 Highway 2 in Promise City.

The rescued dogs will be brought to the Wayne County Fairgrounds and taken to a veterinarian for inspection before being take to shelters.    

‘I’m glad to get this part of it behind us,’ Sheriff Keith Davis told KCRG. 

‘Then we’ll go ahead and pursue the criminal charges which are going to come later on.’  

Gingerich has said he has since felt remorse over the situation and takes responsibility for his actions.He has agreed to stop selling, breeding and brokering dogs. 

‘He apologized to me and said, you know, he’s the one to blame for all this,‘ Sheriff Davis added. ‘He’s taking responsibility.’

The agreement settling the lawsuit between Gingerich and the DOJ has yet to be signed off by a judge.     

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